La Llorona

LAS LLORONAS – the Wicked Lit adaptation of “La Llorona”

"Las Lloronas" - Wicked Lit 2014, from Unbound Productions. www.wickedlit.org

Lisa McNeely in “Las Lloronas.” Wicked Lit 2014. Photo by Ellen Smiler

by Jonathan Josephson
Cast: 8 (5 W, 3M) with doubling,
– up to 16 featured roles
– up to 25 with an ensemble
One act: 30-35 minutes
Rating: Mature high school and up

Freely adapted from the legend “La Llorona” and historical events. The Mexican legend “La Llorona” tells the story of a scorned woman who drowns her children and then haunts the earth searching for their souls. The play “Las Lloronas” examines this myth as it has evolved through the ages – from the days of La Malinche and the conquest of Mexico through present day events. El Diablo guides us through five unique stories – some literal, some theatrical, some abstract – that reflect the horror and regret embodied by this timeless tale.

"Las Lloronas" - Wicked Lit 2014, from Unbound Productions. www.wickedlit.org

Melissa Perl in “Las Lloronas.” Wicked Lit 2014. Photo by Ellen Smiler

“Plays like gangbusters”
– Terry Morgan, Stage Raw

If you are interested in getting more information about how to license this play, please contact Steele Spring Stage Rights.

CHARACTER BREAKDOWN

Note: When specified, as each of the monologues are performed, the non-speaking characters step into the scene and enact the story with incidental dialogue, movement, pantomime, and dance.

"Las Lloronas" - Wicked Lit 2014, from Unbound Productions. www.wickedlit.org

Joe Camareno in “Las Lloronas.” Wicked Lit 2014.” Photo by Ellen Smiler

El Diablo: our all-knowing, devious, vindictive master of ceremonies.

Doña Marina: 20s/30s, a Nahua woman from the Mexican Gulf Coast, mid 16th Century. Inspired by La Malinche – interpreter, adviser, lover, and intermediary for Spanish Conquistador Hernán Cortés.
– Happy Maria – Witch

Araceli Gonzales: 20s, a Mexican flower-shop girl, early 19th century. Inspired by the iconic representations of the “La Llorona” folkloric protagonist
– The Weeping Woman
– Prostitute
– Spanish Lady
– Soldier
– Pia’s Daughter

"Las Lloronas" - Wicked Lit 2014, from Unbound Productions. www.wickedlit.org

Anna Gabrielle Gonzalez in “Las Lloronas.” Wicked Lit 2014.” Photo by Ellen Smiler

Lady Amélie: 30s, European royalty living in mid-19th Century Mexico. Inspired by Carlota of Mexico, empress consort of Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico, the former Archduke of Austria.
– Attendant – Maria’s Mother
– Prostitute
– Council of Aztecs
– Midwife
– Soldier
– Vain Maria

Leigh Wilson: 20s, mother of two living in 1990s New Mexico. Inspired by Susan Smith who was found guilty of murder in the drowning deaths of her two sons by strapping them in their car seats and rolling the car into a lake. – Young Maria
– Council of Aztecs
– Queen of Spain
– Soldier

Pia Faye Thomas: 30s, mother of four living in present day Los Angeles. Loosely inspired by Andrea Yates, a convicted murderer who drowned her five children, ages 6 months to 7 years, in the bathtub of her suburban home.
– Lady of the House
– Attendant
– Prostitute
– Council of Aztecs
– Midwife
– Soldier
– Pious Maria

"Las Lloronas" - Wicked Lit 2014, from Unbound Productions. www.wickedlit.org

Angel Duran in “Las Lloronas.” Wicked Lit 2014.” Photo by Ellen Smiler

The Men: ensemble characters who plays many parts throughout the play of varying ages and time periods.
– Maria’s Father
– Young Lord
– Council of Aztecs
– King of Spain
– Soldier
– Maria’s Love
– Soldier – Mayan Slave Trader – Hernán Cortés
– Emperor Frederick III
– Pia’s Husband
The structure and feel of the play should be fluid and lyrical, not choppy and sectionized.